7 Types of Companies You Should Never Work For

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Woman hiding behind cubicle in office

No matter how desperate you are for a job, or how annoyed you may be at your current gig, there are some companies you’re better off not working for. Even if the money is good, the role seems irresistible, and even your friends say it’s worth a shot, accepting a role at a crappy company can set your career back and even jeopardize your future success.

So how do you know which companies to steer clear of? Here at Glassdoor, we don’t like to point fingers because all companies have the tools to change. Nevertheless, here are 7 types of companies that might as well have “Do not apply” flashing on a neon sign in the window.

1. The High Turnover Outfit

Red flags: Key roles pop up consistently on a company’s job site.

How bad is it: A company should not be on the hunt for the same important roles in management or leadership every six months, and if they are that means that they have fallen into a hire-and-fire cycle. This can indicate a few things. One, leadership may be very fickle; unable to land on the specific qualities they want in a candidate. Two, the company may have a bad internal culture which makes retention nearly impossible, no matter how talented the new hires may be. Three, top level goals may be as fleeting as the talent.

What to do: Companies with high turnover won’t deliver on their promises and may just be a waste of time.

2. The Culture Clash Corp

Red flags: Negative employee reviews, lack of focus on a true employee experience, recruiters evading your questions.

How bad is it: A poor company culture may not seem like a deal breaker, but it should be. Recently, we’ve seen a handful of examples where company culture has significantly handicapped public perception.  Even if a company’s poor culture hasn’t played out publicly, it can be bad for your career. It’s well known that a positive company culture can drive financial performance and a productive workforce. Therefore, a negative culture can do the exact opposite.

What to do: Avoid companies who tout their ping-pong tournament but won’t allow you speak to existing employees about their experiences. Consider ending interview discussions with companies that evade questions about culture. And just say no to places who define “hard work” as 15-hour days and long weekend email threads […]

Source: Glassdoor Blog

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