New Jersey Clarifies, Further Expands Leave and Temporary DB During Epidemics

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Last month, Governor Phil Murphy signed S2374 into law, which further amends and clarifies the March 25 expansions to the New Jersey Family Leave Act (NJFLA) and the New Jersey Temporary Disability Benefits Law (TDL). It also creates new reasons an employee may use protected NJFLA leave during an epidemic.

Specifically, during a state of emergency declared by the governor or when indicated by a public health authority, eligible employees may use family leave to care for a child due to a school or daycare closure, to care for a family member subject to mandatory quarantine, and to care for a family member whose doctor recommends voluntary self-quarantine.

The new law also allows employees to use intermittent leave related to the epidemic and clarifies the type of certification an employer can request from an employee to substantiate leave requests.

Reasons for Family Leave

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, the NJFLA afforded qualifying employees up to 12 weeks of family leave in a 24-month period for the birth or adoption of a child or to care for a family member with a “serious health condition.” On March 25, the law was amended to add certain epidemic-related exigencies to the definition of a “serious health condition.”

The April 14 law eliminates the March 25 expanded definition of a “serious health condition.” Instead, it addresses epidemic-related leave by amending the definition of “family leave.” Now, during a state of emergency declared by the governor or when indicated by a public health authority due to “an epidemic of a communicable disease, a known or suspected exposure to the communicable disease, or efforts to prevent spread of a communicable disease,” an employee may use NJFLA to provide necessary care to a family member when:

  • A child’s school or place of care has closed by order of a public official due to the epidemic or other public health emergency;
  • A public health authority issues a determination, including by mandatory quarantine, requiring or imposing responsive or prophylactic measures as a result of illness caused by an epidemic of a communicable disease or known or suspected exposure to the communicable disease because the presence in the community of a family member in need of care by the employee would jeopardize the health of others; or
  • A health care provider or public health authority recommends that a family member in need of care by the employee voluntarily undergo self-quarantine as a result of suspected exposure to communicable disease because the presence of the family member in the community would jeopardize the health of others.

Intermittent Leave

The new law allows epidemic-related intermittent leave. The employee must provide prior notice as soon as practicable and make a reasonable effort to schedule the leave so as not to unduly disrupt the employer’s operations. When possible, the employee should provide a regular schedule of the days on which the leave will be taken prior to the commencement of the intermittent leave.

No Denial of Epidemic-Related Family Leave

The new law reiterates the March 25 prohibition against denying epidemic-related leave requests. Specifically, for leave requests related to an epidemic of communicable disease, an employer may not use the provision in the NJFLA enabling it to deny leave requests when the employee is among the highest paid employees and the denial is necessary to prevent “substantial and grievous economic injury” to the employer’s operations.

Certification

To verify the leave is being taken for an epidemic-related reason, the new law allows an employer to require an employee to provide certification issued by a school, place of care for children, public health authority, public official, or healthcare provider. For closure of a child’s school or place of care, the certification is sufficient if it includes the date on which the closure commenced and the reason for closure.

When leave is needed to care for a family member because a public health authority issues a determination requiring or imposing responsive or prophylactic measures as a result of illness caused by an epidemic of a communicable disease or known or suspected exposure to the communicable disease, the certification is sufficient when it includes the date the determination was issued and the probable duration of the determination.

When leave is due to a healthcare provider or public health authority’s recommendation that a family member in need of care by the employee voluntarily self-quarantine as a result of suspected exposure, the certification is sufficient when it contains the date of the recommendation, the probable duration of the certification, and the medical or other facts within the healthcare provider’s or public health authority’s knowledge regarding the condition.

The new law defines “healthcare provider” as a duly licensed healthcare provider or other healthcare provider deemed appropriate by the director of the New Jersey Division on Civil Rights. Read more here…

The post New Jersey Clarifies, Further Expands Leave and Temporary DB During Epidemics appeared first on HR Daily Advisor.

Source: HR Daily Advisor

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